"I gots me some Shamrock Shakes" - an erotic audio entirely in Irish

06:06 special audio Mar 09, 2017 22 comments 3515 310

Download (8 MB, MP3)

This was a bit of a lark for me, /u/mc_cottle of GWA posted a request for Irish speaking women, and I was intrigued. I took a beginner course in the Irish language and thought I could at least pronounce most of it (which is half the battle, if you know anything about Irish).

Apparently, according to him, it turned out fine. I'm not so sure - I do know it was incredibly difficult to do sucky fucky while trying to speak this language :P

Here is the original script, so you can both find out what I'm saying and appreciate the baffling complexity of Irish :P

In honour of the upcoming St. Patrick's Day - Beannachtaí na Féile Pádraig oraibh!


Comments

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  • MadWithLust on 2017-03-19 16:43:45 (UTC)

    I didn't understand a word but the kissy-sucky was not lost in translation! :D

    Reading the script translation, it was a pretty hot encounter! I was way off when I was thinking it was actually about Shamrock shakes...I haven't had one in years but I'm hoping it gets this kind of results! :P

    • A Eve on 2017-03-22 15:13:55 (UTC)

      haha I hope you had one for my sake! 🍀

  • Stargazer on 2017-03-13 07:32:06 (UTC)

    I'd love to learn the language of my forbears someday but unfortunately nobody seems to teach it round where I live.

    I'll just have to be content with listening I suppose.

    These special audios are really something else Eve love it.

    • A Eve on 2017-03-13 18:27:08 (UTC)

      I highly recommend this app, it's taught by a couple of guys from Ulster (so their accent is more northern) but it's a great introduction to the language. Duolingo is also really good. I've used both of these to supplement my learning, and in many ways there are better than the courses I took here.

      Thank you by the way 💋 Go raibh maith agat mo chuisle.

      • Stargazer on 2017-03-14 07:15:13 (UTC)

        Oh awesome
        I'll have to check those out. Thank ya Eve <3

        • A Eve on 2017-03-16 12:02:23 (UTC)

          tá fáilte romhat 😘

  • Durgarnkuld on 2017-03-12 09:55:11 (UTC)

    Some lovely gibberish ^^"
    Keep it up, Eve. Trying yourself at this, other languages or dialects, shows a lot of effort and curiosity for others.

    • A Eve on 2017-03-12 16:03:22 (UTC)

      Thank you, I do enjoy it. 💋

  • Murtaugh83 on 2017-03-09 23:52:04 (UTC)

    Eve As Gaelige
    Outstanding work, a difficult but beautiful language. All of your work is outstanding and your creative forays never disappoint. Thanks so much.
    Slan Mo Chuisle.

    • A Eve on 2017-03-10 16:56:06 (UTC)

      Go raibh mile maith agat, mo stoirin 💋 Slán leat

  • Georgio36 on 2017-03-09 19:08:29 (UTC)

    Eve Bless your heart for even attempting to do this for us 🍀. Just when i thought you couldn't get even more remarkable; you surprise me again 😊. I thought learning spanish was hard; but this takes the cake. I would fail irish speaking class. But At least i did retain something in erotica form lol. You sounded sexy regardless. Have a great day & i did commented on your newest youtube video whenever you get a chance to see it. Take care!

    • A Eve on 2017-03-10 16:55:03 (UTC)

      Thanks Georgio, I'll check it out this weekend 💋

  • billymacorbuddy on 2017-03-09 14:30:56 (UTC)

    Is Gaelic still commonly spoken over there? I was always under the impression that it wasn't used anymore, but I admit ignorance on the matter.

    • A Eve on 2017-03-09 14:50:03 (UTC)

      It's definitely dying out, there are small areas around the country called the gaeltacht, where people generally speak Irish as a first language. It is still an official language of Ireland, so all the street signs are in both, etc. Irish kids take it all through school, but most people you talk to will have almost zero retention. It's a very, very difficult language, and in my experience it isn't taught well. Some people are very patriotic and keep it alive by choice, but in general you could live in Ireland your whole life and maybe only hear a phrase or two now and then.

      • billymacorbuddy on 2017-03-09 16:21:55 (UTC)

        Well it sounds beautiful, kind of like a real life Elvish. I give you a lot of credit for challenging yourself to learn it.

        • A Eve on 2017-03-10 16:54:44 (UTC)

          Thanks Billy 💋

  • CharlieRomeoLima on 2017-03-09 14:18:58 (UTC)

    Well, for being brave enough to share this with us, go raibh maith agat! I remember listening a week ago to your Goddess worship audio and maybe it doesn't mean much coming from a total non-speaker, but it sounds to me like you've made so much progress in the year and half since that performance - going from sprinkling in a few phrases to an entire six minute audio. I listened a few times with the script and I heard your Irish accent in there too, and considering that no beginner language course on Earth teaches how to speak while doing sucky fucky - good job! And of course, this quickie in the dark room was a hot scenario too, props to the script author mc_cottle.

    Would be nice to visit Ireland someday, the countryside is of course famously beautiful. Just curious, do Dubliners speak Irish regularly enough that you can get immersion in the language?

    • A Eve on 2017-03-09 14:54:44 (UTC)

      tá fáilte romhat - (taw fall-tcha row-at) - you're welcome :P

      Thank you for that, I did take a year long course which mostly aided with pronunciation. As you can see by the script, spoken Irish is virtually nothing like what it looks like in print. I can't think of a single word that sounds the way its spelt, and there are odd rules for the way certain things are pronounced - sometimes 'bh' is pronounced 'v', sometimes it's 'w', if you see a small letter in front of a larger one like "gConai" then you pronounce the small one and not the large one, etc. It's complicated. :P

      No, few people here speak Irish, you have to go to areas in the country called the gaeltacht if you want immersion, but even then you have to really make an effort to speak only in Irish.

      • CharlieRomeoLima on 2017-03-10 01:07:10 (UTC)

        'Twill be fun to baffle the folk on St. Patrick's Day so I might try to learn how to properly pronounce the standard phrases like Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Duit! or Beannachtaí na Féile Pádraig oraibh! Or this gem from the Web: Go n-ithe an cat thú is go n-ithe an diabhal an cat! The page I got that from lists Munster, Ulster and Connacht dialects for saying that phrase. As if learners need more complications!

        In my neck of the woods, there's a movement afoot to revive the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh sníchim (Squamish language) among the aboriginal youth. You will see it on highway signs north of Vancouver and it looks at least as difficult to pronounce as Irish.

        • A Eve on 2017-03-10 16:54:21 (UTC)

          haha yes, it's odd but there are very few 'swear words' if any in Irish, what they usually do is just curse you :P

          I used to live in Coquitlam when I was about three. I don't remember much of it, but there you go :D

  • Jandrusel on 2017-03-09 14:10:08 (UTC) (edited)

    No offense to Irish people, but that script looks like an absolute mess of words. Like an English dictionary throwed up after one too many Guinness. Really, you deserve some props for doing that! You did really well!

    I don't know anything about Ireland except Thin Lizzy and Rory Gallagher (I do love me some Irish rock 🍀🎸 :P) Hopefully, I'll be able to make a trip to that beautiful country in the future and fix that issue.

    • A Eve on 2017-03-09 14:58:21 (UTC)

      thank you very much. It is an absolute mess, it's the most difficult language I've ever attempted. I like it, but on every level it's unlike any other language. It isn't pronounced how it looks, the grammar is very confusing (sentences typically start with the verb and the subject sometimes shows up at the end) and it doesn't translate easily. For example, the sentence "Tá brón orm" (I'm sorry) literally translates as something like "it is that there is sadness on me". The 'me' or "I' part of that is the 'orm'. So you can see how confusing it gets :P

      Yes you should visit, it's incredibly beautiful and Irish people are very friendly and funny :P